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 Traditional Tunes as Interpreted by Donald Angus Beaton. From the 'Dungreen Collection'.

         
  TUNE NOTATION

AUDIO

PLAYED BY
         
  Angus Ronald’s Big Tune Sheet Music

 

Donald Angus & Kinnon Beaton
Sheet Music Mary MacDonald

Beatons of Mabou

  Colonel McBain’s Fancy Sheet Music   Donald Angus & Kinnon Beaton
   

Donald Angus Beaton

  Hughie Rory MacKinnon Sheet Music Donald Angus & Kinnon Beaton
    Sheet Music   Mary MacDonald
     

Beatons of Mabou

  I Won’t Do The Work Sheet Music

Donald Angus Beaton

  London Lasses Sheet Music   Donald Angus Beaton

  MacKinnon’s Brook Strathspey Sheet Music

Donald Angus Beaton

  MacKinnon’s Other Rant Sheet Music

Donald Angus Beaton

  Margaree Sheet Music   Donald Angus Beaton

  Miss Charlotte Alston Stewart’s Sheet Music

Donald Angus Beaton

  Sarah MacArthur’s Sheet Music

Donald Angus & Kinnon Beaton
  Sheet Music   Mary MacDonald

  Stumpie Sheet Music

Donald Angus Beaton

  West Mabou Reel Sheet Music   Donald Angus Beaton

  Whiskey Jig Sheet Music

Donald Angus Beaton

  Willy MacKenzie’s Sheet Music

Donald Angus Beaton
         


A NOTE ABOUT 'WILD NOTES'

This is a note-substitution ornament used in reels which nearly always involves playing a fourth-finger note in place of a third-finger melody note. Frequently, this means that the second scale-degree replaces the tonic, or the sixth scale-degree replaces the fifth. Unlike most other notes which are embellished, the substituted note is usually in a rhythmically weak position (often the last eighth note of a measure) rather than on a strong beat. The wild-note is then played more strongly than the normal note would have been, which adds rhythmic complexity. The wild-note is a characteristic feature of the old "Mabou Coal Mines" style of playing. It imparts a wild and spirited flavour to the tune.

It can be difficult for a listener to judge what is a wild-note substitution and what is a standard melody-note, although often the wild-note will sound dissonant If the fiddler only sometimes plays the wild-note, it is fairly dear which note is the melody-note, or if other fiddlers use a note which sounds more like it belongs to the tune, it is also fairly dear. However, sometimes a wild-note has become an accepted part of a standard Cape Breton version, and it is only by comparing the tune to a book version that one’s instinct can be affirmed. Sometimes there is no such reference for the curious to check.

The notes of the tune are written in the transcriptions just as the particular fiddler played them, since a wild-note may or may not be a part of the skeletal version of the tune in the fiddler’s mind. Suspected wild-notes are notated with a box around them. Usually this indicates that the “real” melody note may be one step below the boxed note. Further speculation or presumptions about a substitution may be found in the commentary accompanying the particular tune, especially if a wild-note seems to be substituting for a note other than a step below it.

Material for this session from DunGreen Collection. Copyright 1996. By Kate Dunlay and David Greenberg. Used with permission.

 


Donald Angus Beaton

His Life & Music
DVD Music Documentary

BUY DVD ($24.95 CAD)

 

 


This project was made possible by funding provided through the Heritage Policy Branch of the Department
of Canadian Heritage. Produced with the assistance of the Audio-Visual Preservation Trust of Canada.
The Life & Music of Donald Angus Beaton sponsored by AV Trust.